THE “4 PER 1000” INITIATIVE IN A FEW WORDS

The international initiative "4 per 1000", launched by France on 1 December 2015 at COP 21, consists of federating all voluntary stakeholders of public and private sectors (national governments, local and regional governments, companies, trade organisations, NGOs, research facilities, etc.) under the framework of the Lima-Paris Action Plan (LPAP).

Supported by solid scientific foundations and practical actions in the field, the 4 per 1000 initiative intends to demonstrate that agriculture, and in particular agricultural soils, can play a crucial role in food security and climate change.

THE HIGH ADDED VALUE OF THE “4 PER 1000” INITIATIVE

The "4 per 1000" initiative should enable some practical actions in the field to be developed, benefiting farmers and livestock breeders, who are the first to be affected by land degradation and, more broadly, by the entire world population.

It is a multi-actor initiative built around two main phases of actions:

  1. A multi-actor, state and non-state action program for better soil carbon management to combat poverty and food insecurity, while contributing to adaptation to climate change and mitigation of emissions.
  2. An international scientific research and cooperation program

THE GOVERNANCE OF THE “4 PER 1000” INITIATIVE

The International Initiative "4 per 1000" was launched on 1 December 2015 by Stéphane Le Foll, then Minister of Agriculture, AgriFood and Forestry, at COP 21 which was held in Paris.

Farmers, economic stakeholders, local Authorities and States then mobilised researchers around this initiative on the agenda of solutions at COP 21 in Paris.

The success of "4 per 1000" was confirmed at COP 22: bringing together civil society, countries, funds and international organisations around a table was a challenge. Bringing 200 together around the issue of soils and agriculture, was a victory!

We talk about it at the following link:

http://agriculture.gouv.fr/le-succes-du-4-pour-1000-la-cop22  

The governance of the "4 per 1000" initiative was launched in Marrakech and marks the strong commitment of the partners!

At COP 22, 80 of the 200 signatories wished to be part of the consortium, in order to take collective decisions, especially on the orientations, goals of the work program, the budget and to define indicators for the monitoring and evaluation of projects.

Today, 110 partner organisations (not-for-profit or non-commercial structures) have joined the Consortium and thus participate in the decision-making process.

GETTING INVOLVED WITH THE “4 PER 1000” INITIATIVE

States and local authorities commit themselves for example to:

  • Support an International Soil Initiative with a triple "win-win-win" goal
  • Set up some training programs for farmers and advisors on agricultural development on improving soil organic matter levels
  • Accompany the transition of agricultural systems through the establishment of a suitable regulatory environment
  • Adopt some appropriate public policies, especially in land tenure such as the Voluntary Guidelines for a Tenure Governance (CSA 2012) and Sustainable Land Management
  • Finance the implementation of development or research projects in line with the "4 per 1000 " initiative
  • Develop some policies for the supply of agricultural products that encourage sustainable soil management through public procurement where appropriate
  • Recognize that soils are vital for life on Earth and that living soils preserve biodiversity. Storing carbon in soils means combating climate changes, increasing their fertility, their water retention capacity and thus potentially the yields, reducing their susceptibility to erosion. This enables rural families, farmers to better live from their work on the land, to make better use of them by remaining sedentary, and thus limiting migratory flows
  • Mobilise the stakeholders to encourage them to take actions in order to conserve soils for food security and climate
  • Support agriculture and forestry as sectors contributing to the fight against climate change
  • Address land degradation while having a positive impact on food security
  • Regulate through public policies to accompany the carbon storage in soils over time, beyond the usual practice of a five-year plan, using another temporal scale (half a century or century for example)
  • Work for the opening of carbon markets to new sectors such as agriculture and agroforestry
  • Valorise the share of agriculture and forestry in the NDCs (Nationally Determined Contribution)
  • Pursue the efforts undertaken for the recognition of the role of agriculture in the fight against climate change

 

IN CONCRETE TERMS, HOW DO WE GET INVOLVED?

Follow the link below:

THEY ALREADY GOT INVOLVED